International Tables for Crystallography (2018). Vol. H, ch. 2.7, pp. 156-173
https://doi.org/10.1107/97809553602060000942

Chapter 2.7. High-pressure devices

Contents

  • 2.7. High-pressure devices  (pp. 156-173) | html | pdf | chapter contents |
    • 2.7.1. Introduction  (p. 156) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.2. Historical perspective  (pp. 156-157) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.3. Main types of high-pressure environments  (pp. 157-159) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.4. The diamond-anvil cell (DAC)  (pp. 159-160) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.5. Variable-temperature high-pressure devices  (pp. 160-161) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.6. Soft and biomaterials under pressure  (p. 161) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.7. Completeness of data  (pp. 161-162) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.8. Single-crystal data collection  (pp. 162-163) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.9. Powder diffraction with the DAC  (pp. 163-164) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.10. Sample preparation  (p. 164) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.11. Hydrostatic conditions  (pp. 164-165) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.12. High-pressure chamber and gasket in the DAC  (pp. 165-166) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.13. High-pressure neutron diffraction  (p. 166) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.14. Pressure determination  (pp. 166-167) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.15. High-pressure diffraction data corrections  (pp. 167-168) | html | pdf |
    • 2.7.16. Final remarks  (p. 168) | html | pdf |
    • References | html | pdf |
    • Figures
      • Fig. 2.7.1. A cross section through a piston-and-cylinder device with a shrink-fitted double cylinder  (p. 158) | html | pdf |
      • Fig. 2.7.2. Cross sections of (a) the girdle anvil, (b) the belt anvil, (c) the Bridgman anvil and (d) the toroid anvil  (p. 158) | html | pdf |
      • Fig. 2.7.3. A schematic view of the opposed-sapphire anvil of the Kurchatov–LBB cell designed for neutron diffraction on magnetic materials (Goncharenko, 2004)  (p. 159) | html | pdf |
      • Fig. 2.7.4. Cross sections of three types of diamond anvil used in high-pressure cells: the brilliant design (supported either on the table or on the crown rim), the Drukker design (supported on the table and crown) and the Boehler–Almax design (supported on the crown)  (p. 159) | html | pdf |
      • Fig. 2.7.5. A cross section through the central part of a diamond-anvil cell, schematically showing the main elements applied in various designs  (p. 160) | html | pdf |
      • Fig. 2.7.6. A diamond-anvil cell, showing the 40° half-angle opening of the conical windows and the reciprocal space accessed for a single-crystal sample and Mo Kα or Ag Kα radiation  (p. 161) | html | pdf |
      • Fig. 2.7.7. A schematic illustration of the reciprocal space associated with a sample enclosed in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC)  (p. 162) | html | pdf |
    • Tables
      • Table 2.7.1. The (pseudo)hydrostatic limits of selected media at 296 K (Holzapfel, 1997; Miletich et al., 2000)  (p. 165) | html | pdf |
      • Table 2.7.2. Luminescence pressure sensors, their electronic transition types (s = singlet, d = doublet) and rates of spectral shifts (after Holzapfel, 1997)  (p. 167) | html | pdf |
      • Table 2.7.3. Parameters recommended for pressure determination by EOS measurements  (p. 167) | html | pdf |
      • Table 2.7.4. Pressure fixed points at ambient temperature (after Holzapfel, 1997; Hall, 1980)  (p. 167) | html | pdf |